LΘRD ▲nd ΔMΘR

expose-the-light:

Andromeda Galaxy
The Andromeda Galaxy (/ænˈdrɒmədə/) is a spiral galaxy approximately 2.5 million light-years (2.4×1019 km) from Earthin the Andromeda constellation. It is also known as Messier 31, M31, or NGC 224, and is often referred to as the Great Andromeda Nebula in older texts. The Andromeda Galaxy is the nearest spiral galaxy to our galaxy (Milky Way), but not the closest galaxy overall. 
In the image
1. Artist’s concept of the Andromeda Galaxy core showing a view across a disk of young, blue stars encircling a supermassive black hole. NASA/ESA photo
2. The Andromeda Galaxy as seen by NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer
3. The Andromeda Galaxy pictured in ultraviolet light by GALEX
4. Stars in the Andromeda Galaxy’s disc.
expose-the-light:

Andromeda Galaxy
The Andromeda Galaxy (/ænˈdrɒmədə/) is a spiral galaxy approximately 2.5 million light-years (2.4×1019 km) from Earthin the Andromeda constellation. It is also known as Messier 31, M31, or NGC 224, and is often referred to as the Great Andromeda Nebula in older texts. The Andromeda Galaxy is the nearest spiral galaxy to our galaxy (Milky Way), but not the closest galaxy overall. 
In the image
1. Artist’s concept of the Andromeda Galaxy core showing a view across a disk of young, blue stars encircling a supermassive black hole. NASA/ESA photo
2. The Andromeda Galaxy as seen by NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer
3. The Andromeda Galaxy pictured in ultraviolet light by GALEX
4. Stars in the Andromeda Galaxy’s disc.
expose-the-light:

Andromeda Galaxy
The Andromeda Galaxy (/ænˈdrɒmədə/) is a spiral galaxy approximately 2.5 million light-years (2.4×1019 km) from Earthin the Andromeda constellation. It is also known as Messier 31, M31, or NGC 224, and is often referred to as the Great Andromeda Nebula in older texts. The Andromeda Galaxy is the nearest spiral galaxy to our galaxy (Milky Way), but not the closest galaxy overall. 
In the image
1. Artist’s concept of the Andromeda Galaxy core showing a view across a disk of young, blue stars encircling a supermassive black hole. NASA/ESA photo
2. The Andromeda Galaxy as seen by NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer
3. The Andromeda Galaxy pictured in ultraviolet light by GALEX
4. Stars in the Andromeda Galaxy’s disc.
expose-the-light:

Andromeda Galaxy
The Andromeda Galaxy (/ænˈdrɒmədə/) is a spiral galaxy approximately 2.5 million light-years (2.4×1019 km) from Earthin the Andromeda constellation. It is also known as Messier 31, M31, or NGC 224, and is often referred to as the Great Andromeda Nebula in older texts. The Andromeda Galaxy is the nearest spiral galaxy to our galaxy (Milky Way), but not the closest galaxy overall. 
In the image
1. Artist’s concept of the Andromeda Galaxy core showing a view across a disk of young, blue stars encircling a supermassive black hole. NASA/ESA photo
2. The Andromeda Galaxy as seen by NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer
3. The Andromeda Galaxy pictured in ultraviolet light by GALEX
4. Stars in the Andromeda Galaxy’s disc.

expose-the-light:

Andromeda Galaxy

The Andromeda Galaxy (/ænˈdrɒmədə/) is a spiral galaxy approximately 2.5 million light-years (2.4×1019 km) from Earthin the Andromeda constellation. It is also known as Messier 31, M31, or NGC 224, and is often referred to as the Great Andromeda Nebula in older texts. The Andromeda Galaxy is the nearest spiral galaxy to our galaxy (Milky Way), but not the closest galaxy overall. 

In the image

1. Artist’s concept of the Andromeda Galaxy core showing a view across a disk of young, blue stars encircling a supermassive black hole. NASA/ESA photo

2. The Andromeda Galaxy as seen by NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer

3. The Andromeda Galaxy pictured in ultraviolet light by GALEX

4. Stars in the Andromeda Galaxy’s disc.


nubbsgalore:

circumhorizontal arcs photographed by (click pic) david england, andy cripe, del zane, todd sackmann and brandon rios. this atmospheric phenomenon, otherwise known as a fire rainbow, is created when light from a sun that is at least 58 degrees above the horizon passes through the hexagonal ice crystals that form cirrus clouds which, because of quick cloud formation, have become horizontally aligned. (see also: previous cloud posts)
nubbsgalore:

circumhorizontal arcs photographed by (click pic) david england, andy cripe, del zane, todd sackmann and brandon rios. this atmospheric phenomenon, otherwise known as a fire rainbow, is created when light from a sun that is at least 58 degrees above the horizon passes through the hexagonal ice crystals that form cirrus clouds which, because of quick cloud formation, have become horizontally aligned. (see also: previous cloud posts)
nubbsgalore:

circumhorizontal arcs photographed by (click pic) david england, andy cripe, del zane, todd sackmann and brandon rios. this atmospheric phenomenon, otherwise known as a fire rainbow, is created when light from a sun that is at least 58 degrees above the horizon passes through the hexagonal ice crystals that form cirrus clouds which, because of quick cloud formation, have become horizontally aligned. (see also: previous cloud posts)
nubbsgalore:

circumhorizontal arcs photographed by (click pic) david england, andy cripe, del zane, todd sackmann and brandon rios. this atmospheric phenomenon, otherwise known as a fire rainbow, is created when light from a sun that is at least 58 degrees above the horizon passes through the hexagonal ice crystals that form cirrus clouds which, because of quick cloud formation, have become horizontally aligned. (see also: previous cloud posts)
nubbsgalore:

circumhorizontal arcs photographed by (click pic) david england, andy cripe, del zane, todd sackmann and brandon rios. this atmospheric phenomenon, otherwise known as a fire rainbow, is created when light from a sun that is at least 58 degrees above the horizon passes through the hexagonal ice crystals that form cirrus clouds which, because of quick cloud formation, have become horizontally aligned. (see also: previous cloud posts)
nubbsgalore:

circumhorizontal arcs photographed by (click pic) david england, andy cripe, del zane, todd sackmann and brandon rios. this atmospheric phenomenon, otherwise known as a fire rainbow, is created when light from a sun that is at least 58 degrees above the horizon passes through the hexagonal ice crystals that form cirrus clouds which, because of quick cloud formation, have become horizontally aligned. (see also: previous cloud posts)
nubbsgalore:

circumhorizontal arcs photographed by (click pic) david england, andy cripe, del zane, todd sackmann and brandon rios. this atmospheric phenomenon, otherwise known as a fire rainbow, is created when light from a sun that is at least 58 degrees above the horizon passes through the hexagonal ice crystals that form cirrus clouds which, because of quick cloud formation, have become horizontally aligned. (see also: previous cloud posts)
nubbsgalore:

circumhorizontal arcs photographed by (click pic) david england, andy cripe, del zane, todd sackmann and brandon rios. this atmospheric phenomenon, otherwise known as a fire rainbow, is created when light from a sun that is at least 58 degrees above the horizon passes through the hexagonal ice crystals that form cirrus clouds which, because of quick cloud formation, have become horizontally aligned. (see also: previous cloud posts)

nubbsgalore:

circumhorizontal arcs photographed by (click pic) david england, andy cripe, del zane, todd sackmann and brandon rios. this atmospheric phenomenon, otherwise known as a fire rainbow, is created when light from a sun that is at least 58 degrees above the horizon passes through the hexagonal ice crystals that form cirrus clouds which, because of quick cloud formation, have become horizontally aligned. (see also: previous cloud posts)



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